About

First let me tell you our location, because I found it super frustrating when I was searching for my dogs and had to click all over each website trying to figure out where in the heck the breeder was located. We live in south Snohomish, we are still new but our area is referred to as Maltby and even closer is Echo Lake. We are 8 miles from Woodinville and 27 miles to the Space Needle in downtown Seattle. If anyone is traveling we are 35 miles from Sea-Tac airport and 20 miles from Paine Field Airport in Everett.

I have been with my husband for about a decade, married in 2013. I have a step-son that is 17 years old and he is with us part time. My first litter was born in August 2014 and as we close 2020 we have had 32 litters and 166 puppies. I try to use social media to share what happens in our lives and with our dogs because between covid and crazies it just isn’t safe to allow every interested person inside of our home but I still feel it’s really important to share more about us, how our dogs lives and what goes on in the eight weeks that we have puppies.

I am flattered and appreciative when people compliment the behavior of our dogs but I would not consider myself a dog trainer. Dog training interests me and I have learned a lot in the last decade but I still have so much more to learn. Dogs are such irresistible animals; they really do seem to feel joy in being around us and making us happy. Think of how much time we spend looking for that in a life partner. We have to be mindful that a dog and a human aren’t the same and I have actually struggled with this myself. I have referred to my dogs as my “daughters” for years and I have walked in our home after being gone for a short trip to the market and greeted them with high pitched squeals of delight. I have allowed them to follow me in the bathroom and sleep in my bed. All of these behaviors come out of love. I love my dogs so much it is challenging to put in to words without sounding insincere. What I found is that some of my past behaviors were not the best thing for my dog and they were creating separation anxiety and making them feel stressed instead of intensely loved. I am actively working on this and I talk about it a lot on Instagram stories. My training in 2020 has been really focused on having the dogs fully relax. Sounds silly, who doesn’t know how to relax? Most likely a dog. They are often half listening for noises outside, ready to bark at the UPS driver. My dogs are crate trained and love their crate but since they are no longer puppies if I left our house I would let them have access to the whole house. It sounds crazy now but thinking about my previous mindset I thought they might be offended in some way if I locked them in their crate – like I don’t trust them. They aren’t offended because they don’t even think like that. What they are doing is worrying that I’m gone and in addition they are feeling obligated to guard my home. I have an alarm for that, let’s take some pressure off because the truth is these are not guard dogs. Putting them in the crate when I leave is really giving them the gift to take time off from guarding and just relax in to a nap. What a kind thing to do for a dog. Sometimes, especially for women that like to nurture, this is a perspective that does not come naturally. As I said before, I am working on it.

My husband and I try and travel at least once a year but that can be challenging since the timing of breeding and heat cycles can be unpredictable. We have gone to Japan twice and also took a trip to Thailand, we have many Disney trips and try to go to Universal Studios Halloween Horror Nights in both Ca and Fl each year because scary stuff is the best. We had a zombie themed wedding in NYC with a flashmob! We moved to Snohomish in 2020 (formerly in Bothell) and I feel so grateful to be able to live somewhat out in the country on an acre with some room and privacy but with shopping and movies etc about 15 minutes away in Woodinville. Life is good!

I want to make sure to remind you that before getting a dog you need to take into account your lifestyle and circumstances.  For most of us we want a dog that can satisfy our need for companionship, is easily trained and doesn’t require a lot of upkeep but for the first two years a puppy takes a lot more of your time – this isn’t a video game that you can pull off the shelf when YOU feel like playing. A puppy means coming straight home from work instead of happy hour or dinner dates, going to just one movie instead of hopping over for a second, waking up early on weekends and the list goes on. A golden retriever is a little more of a shy dog so these puppies need to be socialized early. Poodles are really smart dogs (to be fair retrievers are too) which means they can get bored easily and might have a little more drive than you expected. This might mean the dog NEEDS to go for walks or play fetch even when it is January and 28 degrees outside or day 9 of a long steak of rainy Washington weather. A dog is a really big commitment and if I don’t think it is a good fit then I have the right to decline any requests to purchase one of my puppies. I want to be sure I find a good fit that will benefit you both. Many breeders just want to be sure you can afford the dog and end the relationship when you take the puppy home. I consider each puppy my grandchild and that means each new family becomes my family. I stay in touch with our new families as the puppies grow and try to be available for questions and support. I have a private Facebook group for our families to connect and create some community either for tips, support, playdates and/or dog sitting.

-Taylor

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